Spotify might allow high-profile artists to restrict music to paid subscribers, report says

Article Image Streaming music giant Spotify is apparently buckling under the load of increased competition from the likes of Apple Music, as a report on Tuesday claims the service is considering a new content “windowing” policy that would make music from select artists available only to paying subscribers.

The original article can be found here: http://appleinsider.com.feedsportal.com/c/33975/f/616168/s/4c188d3a/sc/28/l/0Lappleinsider0N0Carticles0C150C120C0A80Cspotify0Emight0Eallow0Ehigh0Eprofile0Eartists0Eto0Erestrict0Emusic0Eto0Epaid0Esubscribers0Ereport0Esays/story01.htm

Powered by WPeMatico

How to hand off Mail, Messages and more from Apple Watch to Mac

Apple Watch relies heavily on iOS Continuity features like Handoff to ease the load, in some cases transferring to iPhone complex tasks that require a keyboard or access to a full-fledged app. Not documented in the Apple Watch user guide, however, is the ability to transfer these same tasks to Mac.



The original article can be found here: http://appleinsider.com.feedsportal.com/c/33975/f/616168/s/467faa4c/sc/28/l/0Lappleinsider0N0Carticles0C150C0A50C20A0Chow0Eto0Ehand0Eoff0Email0Emessages0Eand0Emore0Efrom0Eapple0Ewatch0Eto0Emac/story01.htm

Powered by WPeMatico

Ask Anything: What Happens In Your Computer When You Turn It On?

Inner Workings
Jamie Grill/Getty Images

Before a computer can load its operating system and locate drivers for its components, it must recognize that it has been turned on at all. This task falls to a relatively simple device known as the power-on reset circuit. “In its very basic form, it’s simply a little capacitor and a resistor and a little inverter, something like that,” says David Blaauw, a professor in the Michigan Integrated Circuits Laboratory at the University of Michigan. The power-on reset circuit is hardwired to recognize a minimum voltage level. When voltage crosses that threshold, the circuit signals the processor to execute a set of commands that allow for the loading up of the system.

This “instruction zero” could be hardwired, says Blaauw, but it’s generally placed on a flash chip on the computer’s motherboard. That way, the details of what it says can be left to the people who put the computer together.

Power-on reset circuits tell a computer how to start but also how to stop. Left unsupervised, a loss of voltage can be very damaging. At zero voltage, a processor won’t do anything at all, but at very low voltages, its behavior turns erratic. In a worst-case scenario, it may start making unpredictable changes to memory locations. That’s where the power-on reset circuit comes in: “It will detect that you have lost power,” says Blaauw, “and then it will assert a reset signal that stops the processor from doing anything foolish.”

This article originally appeared in the March 2014 issue of Popular Science.

The original article can be found here: http://www.popsci.com/article/gadgets/ask-anything-what-happens-your-computer-when-you-turn-it

Powered by WPeMatico