Here Is The Hardware Powering The International 2015 Dota 2 Championships

Maingear

The hardware to power The International Dota 2 Championships 2015, before being sent to Seattle.

Tomorrow will mark the end of The International Dota 2 Championship 2015, the most lucrative e-sport tournament of all time, with the final pool well above $18 million dollars. Sixteen teams came to play—but they’re not using their own computers. Nvidia, the hardware supplier of The International 2015, worked closely with gaming computer manufacturer Maingear to design the computers for the tournament. Maingear designed and built all the rigs for TI5 in their New Jersey facility.

The biggest concern when designing the computers was latency, says Maingear CEO Wallace Santos.

“Everything has to be designed with low-latency in mind,” Santos said. “We can’t use regular hard drives, we can’t use any lower-end GPUs, we need to use the best of everything for these guys. Even though the game is not that demanding, we still need to be 10 steps ahead in terms of performance.”

The cost of the computers actually went over-budget because Maingear wanted to ensure that there would be no chance of underpowering or overheating of the components.

“We went over that [budget] a little bit because we wanted to use server-grade parts for the power supply, for example, with an 80 Plus Platinum rating,” Santos said. The “80 Plus” rating is a voluntary, independent power efficiency grading. The Platinum level is actually second best, falling only behind 80 Plus Titanium.

The computers are based on Maingear’s X-Cube, their high-performance gaming and home entertainment line.
Here are the specs:

The computers are all hooked up to Benq XL2420G monitors, which feature a 144Hz refresh rate and 1ms GTG for low latency. The Benq monitors feature Nvidia G-Sync, which matches the display refresh rate to the Nvidia GPU. This reduces screen tearing, minimizes display stutter and input lag.

Maingear

The Maingear computers being wrapped and sent to The International 2015 Dota 2 Championships.

The original article can be found here: http://www.popsci.com/hardware-powering-international-2015-dota-2-championships

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Dota 2 prize fund now over $10 million: Not bad for a free-to-play PC-only game

Dota 2, The International 3
Early this morning, the prize fund for the Dota 2 International tournament crossed the $10 million mark. Remarkably, just $1.6 million of the prize fund was provided by Valve; the rest was contributed by members of the Dota 2 community who are eager to get their hands on some in-game items, and to support their favorite teams and the nascent esport as a whole. With a prize fund of over $10 million, The International 4 is now larger than The Masters golf tournament.

The original article can be found here: http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/185423-dota-2-prize-fund-now-over-10-million-not-bad-for-a-free-to-play-pc-only-game

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With a $6 million prize fund, Dota 2 is now one of the world’s biggest sports

Dendi, at The International, with his adoring fans
Valve’s annual Dota 2 tournament — The International — is now one of world’s biggest sporting events. Thanks to the Valve’s most excellent shepherding of both the game and the 5-versus-5 MOBA genre, an ingenious crowdfunding scheme, and the continuing growth of spectator esports, The International now has a total prize fund of over $6 million. The winning team will take home somewhere in the region of $3 million. To put that into perspective, that’s more than all but the top sports professionals take home in a year. How did Dota 2, which only left beta testing last year, become one of the world’s biggest sports in the world?

The original article can be found here: http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/182856-with-a-6-million-prize-fund-dota-2-is-now-one-of-the-worlds-biggest-sports

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