OTA Report: Consumer Services Sites More Trustworthy Than .Gov Sites


The Online Trust Alliance on Tuesday released its 2017 Online Trust Audit & Honor Roll. Among its findings: Consumer services sites have the best combined security and privacy practices. FDIC 100 banks and U.S. government sites are the least trustworthy. The number of websites that qualified for the Honor Roll reached a nine-year high. However, the audit identified an alarming three-year trend: Increasingly, sites either take privacy and security seriously and do well in the audit, or they lag behind significantly in one or more critical areas.

The original article can be found here: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/84629.html?rss=1

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Online Trust Alliance Launches IoT Security Campaign


The Online Trust Alliance is calling on businesses, consumers and government to share responsibility for ensuring that Internet of Things devices are not weaponized, outlining actions that businesses, consumers and government can take to ensure the security and privacy of IoT devices. It calls for a campaign to have retailers and consumers reject IoT products that pose a security threat. OTA Executive Director Craig Spiezle will meet with White House staff, and FTC and FCC commissioners to kickstart efforts to harden IoT security measures.

The original article can be found here: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/84354.html?rss=1

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'Professional authenticators' will rid its site of fake goods, eBay says

In an effort to maintain customer trust and keep brands and sellers onside, eBay is stepping up efforts to rid its site of fake goods. However, the system, which involves the use of so-called “professional authenticators,” comes at a cost.

The original article can be found here: http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2017/01/13/professional-authenticators-will-rid-its-site-fake-goods-ebay-says.html

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Amazon Cracks Down on Review Freebies


In a bid to help bolster trust in its customer ratings, Amazon on Monday announced that it no longer would allow most incentivized reviews — that is, reviews written in exchange for receiving products free or at a discount. Such reviews comprise only a small percentage of the tens of millions of reviews of products sold on the site, maintained Amazon Vice President of Customer Experience Chee Chew. The company recently introduced a machine learning algorithm that gives more weight to newer, more helpful reviews, he noted.

The original article can be found here: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/83962.html?rss=1

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