Offsetting Asymmetry With Automation


In the security world, there is a truism that defense is harder than offense because it’s an asymmetric playing field. The bad guys need only find one path into an environment — one place where everything hasn’t been done perfectly — while those charged with securing that environment need to protect against intrusions everywhere. The asymmetry is apparent in other respects as well. For example, a large percentage of a company’s staff members may go home at night, but attackers can operate from wherever, whenever.

The original article can be found here: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/84970.html?rss=1

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Vendors Gain Congressional Support on IT Pricing


Selling information technology to the U.S. government is never easy, and it’s even harder when a vendor cannot highlight the qualitative differences it believes separates its competencies from other providers competing for the same work. Yet a major contracting tool federal agencies use in seeking IT products and services tends to smother those differences in skills and competencies — much to the chagrin of IT providers. Now, Congress is taking steps to reduce the vendors’ anxiety.

The original article can be found here: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/83537.html?rss=1

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Apple hires former HP executive to boost corporate & government sales

Apple is pushing harder to sell hardware to enterprise and government markets, and has bolstered those efforts with the hire of a longtime executive at PC maker Hewlett-Packard, it was revealed on Thursday.



The original article can be found here: http://appleinsider.com.feedsportal.com/c/33975/f/616168/s/42221380/sc/1/l/0Lappleinsider0N0Carticles0C150C0A10C0A80Capple0Ehires0Eformer0Ehp0Eexecutive0Eto0Eboost0Ecorporate0Egovernment0Esales/story01.htm

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Why You Should Still Care About Moore's Law


Ironically, the greater IT accomplishments become, the harder they are to see. Consider Intel’s latest achievement: the new Broadwell architecture that shrank microprocessor manufacturing from the previous generation 22nm Haswell process to 14nm. Since a nanometer is a millionth of a millimeter — a human hair is about 100,000nm thick — you’d be hard pressed to tell the difference without an electron microscope. Practically speaking, though, Broadwell increases the number of transistors Intel can squeeze onto a microprocessor by a third.

The original article can be found here: http://www.ecommercetimes.com/story/80913.html?rss=1

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